Court refuses to free two bloggers, adjourns appeal hearing until next month

first_img Help by sharing this information Receive email alerts June 8, 2021 Find out more RSF calls for a fully transparent investigation after mine kills two journalists in Azerbaijan “We’ll hold Ilham Aliyev personally responsible if anything happens to this blogger in France” RSF says June 4, 2021 Find out more Russian peacekeepers deny foreign reporters access to Nagorno-Karabakh Reporters Without Borders is deeply disappointed that a Baku appeal court refused today to provisionally release jailed bloggers Adnan Hadjizade and Emin Milli and adjourned the hearing of their appeal until 8 January. Their lawyers protested against the court’s treatment of the bloggers, who were led handcuffed into the courtroom.“By refusing to release Hadjizade and Milli on bail, by treating them as dangerous criminals and by postponing their appeal hearing, the court has lost an opportunity to save face in this judicial farce,” Reporters Without Borders said.The press freedom organisation added: “No one is fooled. Hadjizade and Mili are being persecuted for criticising the authorities and distributing a video that made fun of corrupt politicians. Perhaps we cannot ask the authorities to share their sense of humour, but it is our duty to remind them of the international undertakings Azerbaijan has given to respect freedom of expression.”Reporters Without Borders is also concerned about the health of Hadjizade, whose nose was broken during the assault in the restaurant and who has had difficulty breathing ever since.Hadjizade, a video blogger and member of the non-political “OL! Youth Movement,” and Milli, one of the founders of the “Alumni Network” collective, were arrested on 8 July after being assaulted by three men in a Baku restaurant. Accused of attacking their assailants, they were convicted last month on charges of “hooliganism” and “deliberate physical violence,” and were sentenced to 24 and 30 months in prison respectively.If their appeal is rejected, their lawyers have said they will refer the case to the European Court of Human Rights.In a resolution on freedom of expression in Azerbaijan adopted on 16 December, the European Parliament voiced concern about the worsening media situation and called for due process in the case of Hadjizade and Milli, condemning their imprisonment and demanding their immediate release. Follow the news on Azerbaijan News RSF_en center_img to go further AzerbaijanEurope – Central Asia December 22, 2009 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Court refuses to free two bloggers, adjourns appeal hearing until next month News Organisation News News AzerbaijanEurope – Central Asia April 9, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

Green Street Village, Pasadena’s Newest Landmark District, Gets Festive for its First Christmas

first_img First Heatwave Expected Next Week 12 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Make a comment Local merchants and shoppers alike are excited to experience what the future holds for the the City’s newest Landmark District called Green Street Village. This newest district is nestled in the quaint neighborhood along Green Street just east of South Lake Avenue between Mentor and Wilson Avenues.The “Village” gives both locals and out-of-towners the opportunity to enjoy a diverse selection of restaurants, shops and services in a tree-lined neighborhood now marked with new street signs that make the district official and open for business.“I think it creates more a destination for both locals and tourists for the shopping, the great restaurants on these two blocks in Pasadena,” said High Low Vintage Owner and Green Street Village Board Member Carolyn Gray.Gray, whose vintage clothing business that has been at its location on the 1000 block of East Green Street for over five years, is a member of the Green Street Village Board a long with neighboring businesses Century Books and luxury clothing consigner Walker/Viden.According to Gray, the process to distinguish Green Street Village as a landmark district took well over a year to come to fruition.“We are creating a destination for eating, shopping and so many other things for tourists and locals,” said Gray.Green Street Village’s genesis didn’t arise from City government planners, but by business owners like Gray.“What happens in Pasadena is the people understand that it’s important to sort of respect heritage and historic consistency and that there’s real value, not just in residential neighborhoods, but in commercial districts as well to recognize the unique character and ambiance that some of our commercial districts have,” Mayor Terry Tornek said. “This is not a City Hall inspired piece work—this is something that came from the property owners and the merchants in this area.”Other business that helped make Green Street Village possible are excited about the future.“I am thrilled about Green Street Village because it’s a way to kind of market this really sweet section of town on Green Street. Everybody love Green Street in Pasadena, but this section is really, really special not just because of the historic significance—it’s just beautiful. This collection of businesses is really exciting,” said Managing Director of luxury consignment store Walker/Viden Jennie Walker.Steve Marosvolgyi, Owner of Century Books in the Green Street Village district, said he already sees the positive impact on his business.I think it’s a part of a revitalization of the whole neighborhood. All the neighbors in the area are discovering us,” said Marosvolgyi.“What’s cool about Pasadena is that we have these kind of magical little nodes across the city and it’s exciting as a council person to watch these kind of take their organic form. Now there’s a great sense of organic vibrancy that’s perfect for this city, perfect for this area and I wish them them the best of luck,” said District 7 Councilmember Andy Wilson.The newly designated district will host its first “Holiday on Green Street” event on Thursday, December 15th from 5 p.m. until 10 p.m. The event will offer Free Dance Lessons, Illustrators, Holiday Stress Facials, Giveaways, Baskets, Live Music, Champagne, Dancers, Art, Wine Tasting and Special Discounts.Here’s a list of what is planned for the event:Dance Street will provide dancers who will give dance lessons on the patio of Madeline Garden and also perform throughout the evening inside merchant stores and outside on the sidewalk.1202 Salon and Spa with holiday stress facials and gift baskets in a pop up shop at Madeline Garden.Madeline Garden with a wine tasting and dance lessons from Dance Street on their patio from 6:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m.High Low Vintage with music from guitarist Peter Skrabak from 7:00 p.m. – 10:00 p.m. plus champagne and treats plus dancers from Dance Street dressed in HLV attire performing on the sidewalk outside of the shop.Walker / Viden Luxury Consignment will have an art show with work from Alex Wu Kang and Gale Fulton Ross along with dancers from Dance Studio performing in clothing from their store, from 7:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m., wine, hors d’oeuvres plus a special flash sale.Century Books with live jazz music by Krys Mach on saxophone from 6:30 p.m. – 10:00 p.m. and a special in-store event with giveaways. There will be an illustrator/caricaturist drawing at front of Century.The nights’ event will also serve to raise awareness for the Pasadena Humane Society and Friends in Deed pet food banks. Be sure to bring pet food, a treat or toy and receive something special.For more information, please visit the Green Street Village website at www.greenstreetvillagepasadena.com. Business News Green Street Village, Pasadena’s Newest Landmark District, Gets Festive for its First Christmas Story and Photography by BRANDON VILLALOVOS Published on Tuesday, December 13, 2016 | 8:39 pm Top of the News Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday More Cool Stuff Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *center_img Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  HerbeautyWant To Seriously Cut On Sugar? You Need To Know A Few TricksHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty7 Most Startling Movie Moments We Didn’t Realize Were InsensitiveHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyStop Eating Read Meat (Before It’s Too Late)HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyTiger Woods’ Ex Wife Found A New Love PartnerHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyA Mental Health Chatbot Which Helps People With DepressionHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyRub This All Over Your Body And He’s Guaranteed To Swoon Over YouHerbeautyHerbeauty faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Donald CommunityPCC- COMMUNITYDarrel Done BusinessVirtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPasadena Public WorksPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Community News Business News Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Subscribe Community News Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadenalast_img read more

Minister urges parent to register children for ‘free’ childcare

first_img By News Highland – January 13, 2010 WhatsApp Calls for maternity restrictions to be lifted at LUH WhatsApp Google+ Almost 10,000 appointments cancelled in Saolta Hospital Group this week Twitter Minister urges parent to register children for ‘free’ childcare Parents of eligible children and service providers in Donegal are being urged to register for the government new free preschool year programme if they haven’t already done so.The scheme replaces the early childcare supplement which saw parents paid one thousand euro directly – it was scrapped in the last budget.Children born between the 2nd of February 2005 and the 30th of June 2006 qualify for the new scheme.Children’s Minister Barry Andrews says with the deadline for applications extended it is not to late to sign up: [podcast]http://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/01/barr.mp3[/podcast]You can get more information about the programme and its availability in your area HERE Facebook Previous articleDeputy McGinley’s fears of a ‘lost generation’Next articleFine Gael to select by-election candidate next month News Highland Business Matters Ep 45 – Boyd Robinson, Annette Houston & Michael Margeycenter_img Facebook Three factors driving Donegal housing market – Robinson LUH system challenged by however, work to reduce risk to patients ongoing – Dr Hamilton RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Twitter Pinterest Google+ Newsx Adverts Guidelines for reopening of hospitality sector published Pinterestlast_img read more

Dail passes bill calling for immediate rent freeze

first_imgHomepage BannerNews Nine til Noon Show – Listen back to Monday’s Programme By News Highland – December 12, 2019 WhatsApp Facebook Dail passes bill calling for immediate rent freeze WhatsApp The Dáil has passed a bill calling for an immediate rent freeze.The Sinn Féin bill passed 83 votes to 36 with Fianna Fáil’s support.It calls for a three year rent freeze and for the government to examine a tax rebate for renters.The bill will now move to committee stage where further amendments can be made. RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Facebook Previous articleSupplementary estimates show funding dysfunctionality of Gov – DohertyNext articleFarming News&Views 11/11/19 News Highland Twittercenter_img Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic Pinterest News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows DL Debate – 24/05/21 Twitter Google+ Google+ Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODA Pinterestlast_img read more

Missouri attorney general sues over duck boat accident that killed 17 people

first_imgJ.B. Forbes/St. Louis Post-Dispatch/TNS/Getty Images(JEFFERSON CITY, Mo.) — The attorney general of Missouri has filed a lawsuit in the wake of the duck boat accident that killed 17 people.“This tragedy should not have happened,” Attorney General Josh Hawley said.He alleges the duck boat’s owner and operator — Branson Duck Vehicles and Ripley Entertainment — ignored safety protocols, including life jacket requirements and weather warnings on July 19, when the boat sank in a Missouri lake during severe weather.Seventeen of 31 passengers died, including nine members of a single family.“My hope is that this lawsuit will ensure that unsafe duck boats and companies who put profits ahead of safety will not continue to operate,” Hawley said in a statement Friday announcing the suit.The suit claims the boat’s owner and operator had “decades of ongoing safety hazards that posed a present and deadly danger to every person who boarded a duck boat.”“Defendants kept that information from passengers and made false promises, fraudulent statements and misrepresentations to consumers that safety was a top priority when, in actuality, it was their own profits,” according to Hawley’s statement on Friday.The boat was not supposed to operate in water if winds in the area clocked in at 35 mph or waves were higher than 2 feet, according to the vessel’s certificate of inspection, released by the U.S. Coast Guard. On the night of the accident, winds on the lake hit 73 mph, and the waves were higher than 3 feet, officials said.It is unclear what the wind speeds and wave measurements on the lake were when the duck boat entered the water.The National Weather Service outpost in Springfield, Missouri, had issued a severe thunderstorm warning for the area that night, predicting winds of up to 60 mph.Suzanne Smagala, a spokeswoman for Ripley Entertainment, the company that owns and operates the duck boats, said in a statement, “We are refrained from commenting on an ongoing investigation, including the suit that has been filed by the Missouri attorney general.”“We continue to fully cooperate with federal and state authorities, including the [National Transportation Safety Board]. We are providing all documentation and materials requested in the case and are complying with all hearing procedures,” the statement said.Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

Coronavirus live updates: University suspends over 100 students for COVID-19 violations

first_imgCLIA ocean-going cruise line members have agreed to conduct 100% testing of passengers and crew prior to embarkation – a travel industry first. #WeAreCruise pic.twitter.com/DtBxaN3hnB— Cruise Lines International Association (CLIA) (@CLIAGlobal) October 6, 2020Oct 06, 12:18 pmUK reports over 14,000 new casesThere were 14,542 new cases of COVID-19 and 76 fatalities confirmed in the United Kingdom over the past 24 hours.The latest daily tally is just short of the record set over the weekend when Public Health England revealed that 15,841 cases between Sept. 25 and Oct. 2 were not included in the United Kingdom’s reported daily case counts due to a technical issue. The unreported cases were added retroactively to reach Saturday’s count of 12,872 new case and Sunday’s 22,961 — the country’s highest single-day rise yet.The cumulative total is now at 530,113 cases with 42,445 deaths, according to the latest data from the U.K. government.The United Kingdom is among a handful of European countries grappling with an uptick in COVID-19 cases, as a second wave of infections hits the region. More than 1,000 students and staff at two U.K. universities — 583 at the University of Sheffield and 433 at the University of Nottingham — are currently isolating after testing positive for COVID-19.ABC News’ Christine Theodorou contributed to this report.Oct 06, 11:54 amWTO sees less severe slump in goods trade this yearThe World Trade Organization (WTO) now predicts a 9.2% drop in global merchandise trade this year.The Geneva-based trade body released the estimate Tuesday, revising its forecast in April of a 12.9% decline this year, following “strong trade performance in June and July.”The WTO also now expects a 7.2% rise in merchandise trade next year, compared to the previous estimate of 21.3% growth.“Whether the recovery can be sustained over the medium term will depend on the strength of investment and employment,” the WTO cautioned. “Both could be undermined if confidence is dented by new outbreaks of COVID-19, which might force governments to impose additional lockdowns.”Oct 06, 11:33 am15 clinical trials of COVID-19 vaccines underway in AfricaThere are 15 clinical trails of potential COVID-19 vaccines underway across the African continent, according to a comment by the Africa Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that was published Tuesday in the journal Nature.Five trials are being carried out in South Africa, four in Egypt and one each in Ghana, Guinea-Bissau, Kenya, Uganda, Zambia and Zimbabwe.“We’ve seen a scramble for access to therapies before,” the Nature comment said. “It happened with HIV and H5N1 influenza, for example. And Africa has ended up at the end of the queue every time. Yet the global economy depends on the continent for its exports of raw materials, food, energy and labour.”“This experience — and the fact that other infectious diseases will surely emerge — is why Africa needs a coordinated strategy to develop, finance, manufacture and deliver vaccines across the continent,” the comment added.For the past few months, the Africa CDC has been working with African leaders and global health officials on a “whole of Africa” coordinated approach to do just that.“Infectious agents span the globe in weeks: vaccinating people on one continent is essential to the health, wealth and well-being of those on the others,” the Nature comment said. “No region can be immune until a meaningful and equitable share of the world’s population is protected — by the tenets of good basic public health as well as a vaccine.”Since the start of the coronavirus pandemic, more than 1.5 million people across the African continent have been diagnosed with COVID-19 and nearly 37,000 of them have died. South Africa accounts for nearly half of all confirmed cases on the continent, according to the latest data from the Africa CDC.Oct 06, 8:47 amItaly on verge of making face masks mandatory outdoorsItalian Health Minister Roberto Speranza said Tuesday the government is working on a proposal to make the use of face masks outdoors mandatory nationwide, as COVID-19 infections have steadily increased in recent months.Italy, once the epicenter of the coronavirus pandemic, gradually loosened restrictions during the spring and summer, following a nearly three-month lockdown that helped get its COVID-19 outbreak under control. But now the country — like several others across Europe — is seeing an uptick in infections.On Saturday, Italy reported 2,844 new cases of COVID-19, its highest single-day jump since April, but still far less than the daily figures being recorded in France, Spain and the United Kingdom as Europe grapples with a second wave of infections.“We must raise our guard with the awareness that our county is better off than others,” Speranza told the lower house of parliament on Tuesday.The government is expected to announce the new measures by Wednesday. Several regions in Italy have already made mask-wearing compulsory, but there is currently no nationwide mandate.“Italy, together with Germany, is the one that in the EU is holding up the second wave better,” Speranza said. “But we must not have any illusions.”Since the start of the pandemic, Italy’s civil protection agency has recorded at least 327,586 confirmed cases with 36,002 deaths.Oct 06, 7:54 amEU agency fast-tracks process on 2nd COVID-19 vaccine candidateThe European Union’s drug regulator has started reviewing a second potential vaccine for COVID-19, which is being developed by Germany’s BioNTech in collaboration with American pharmaceutical company Pfizer.The European Medicines Agency (EMA) announced Tuesday that it has begun a “rolling review” of the latest vaccine candidate in an accelerated regulatory approval process, examining the data as it becomes available rather than waiting for the trial to end.“The start of the rolling review means that the committee has started evaluating the first batch of data on the vaccine, which come from laboratory studies (non-clinical data),” the EMA said in a statement. “This does not mean that a conclusion can be reached yet on the vaccine’s safety and effectiveness, as much of the evidence is still to be submitted to the committee.”The agency added that its decision to start the expedited approval process for the vaccine candidate was based on preliminary results from non-clinical and early clinical studies in adults which suggest that the drug triggers the body’s immune system to fight COVID-19.Last week, the EMA began its first review process of a COVID-19 vaccine candidate — a rolling review of one being developed by U.K.-based pharmaceutical company AstraZeneca in collaboration with England’s University of Oxford.Oct 06, 6:55 amIndia records lowest single-day rise in cases since AugustIndia confirmed another 61,267 new cases of COVID-19 in the past 24 hours, its lowest single-day increase since Aug. 25.An additional 884 coronavirus-related fatalities were also recorded. The country’s cumulative total now stands at 6,685,082 confirmed cases with 103,569 deaths, according to the latest data from the Indian Ministry of Health and Family Welfare.India is only the second country to surpass six million total cases, after the United States. The vast nation of 1.3 billion people has the highest COVID-19 infection rate of anywhere in the world, although it is now on a downward trend. India is on track to become the pandemic’s worst-hit nation within weeks, overtaking the United States, where more than 7.4 million people have been diagnosed with COVID-19.India also has the highest number of recovered COVID-19 patients in the world, with nearly 5.7 million people who have survived the disease. The country’s recovery rate stands at 84%, according to the health ministry.Oct 06, 6:15 amSacred Heart University suspends over 100 students for violating COVID-19 policiesSacred Heart University in Fairfield, Connecticut, has suspended more than 100 students for violating the school’s COVID-19 policies, according to a report by New Haven ABC affiliate WTNH-TV.University officials confirmed to WTNH that there have been at least 109 suspensions since the start of the fall semester due to various health and safety violations that include not wearing face masks, not social distancing and having unauthorized visitors in residence hall rooms.The suspended students were informed that they cannot come back to campus for periods ranging from one week to the rest of the semester. They will continue to attend classes remotely in the meantime, according to WTNH.University leaders hope the suspensions send a clear message that the coronavirus pandemic remains a very real threat and that safety is the number one goal for a successful semester back on campus.“We want everyone to protect themselves and protect each other so that we can end the semester here on campus and have a full semester of on-campus, on-ground learning,” Larry Weilk, dean of students at Sacred Heart University, told WTNH. “Prior to the start of the year, we developed what we call a pioneer promise where we asked all students faculty and staff to promise to protect themselves, the campus community, and the greater Bridgeport and Fairfield community as well.”“We’re all in this together,” he added. “We’re all trying to protect each other and stay healthy.”Oct 06, 5:12 am33 US states and territories in upward trajectory of new cases, FEMA memo saysAn internal memo from the Federal Emergency Management Agency obtained by ABC News on Monday night shows that 33 U.S. states and territories are in an upward trajectory of COVID-19 infections, while four jurisdictions are at a plateau and 19 others are in a downward trend.Both the number of new cases and the number of new deaths reported across the United States were  down Monday in week-over-week comparisons. There were 301,308 new cases confirmed during the period of Sept. 28-Oct. 4, a 2.5% decrease from the previous week. There were also 4,871 coronavirus-related fatalities recorded during the period of Sept. 28-Oct. 4, a 8.2% decrease compared with the week prior, according to the memo.However, the national positivity rate for COVID-19 tests increased slightly from 4.4% to 4.7% in week-to-week comparisons. Currently, 20% of hospitals across the country have more than 80% of beds full in their intensive care units. That figure was 17-18% during the summertime peak, the memo said.In Alabama, COVID-19 cases accounted for 9.2% of the state’s inpatients during the week ending Sept. 29. The number of new cases nearly tripled in the western city of Tuscaloosa — from 562 to 1,549 — between the weeks ending Sept. 22 and Sept. 29, according to the memo.In Colorado, there was a 42.2% relative increase in the number of new COVID-19 cases in Adams County between the weeks ending Sept. 22 and Sept. 29, driven by people under the age of 20. Meanwhile, nearly 80% of cases recorded in the northern city of Boulder since Aug. 24 have been linked to the University of Colorado, the memo said.In Hawaii, there was a cluster of nine COVID-19 cases confirmed at the University of the Nations Kona campus in the town of Kailua-Kona, according to the memo.Oct 06, 4:22 amUS reports nearly 40,000 new casesThere were 39,562 new cases of COVID-19 identified in the United States on Monday, according to a real-time count kept by Johns Hopkins University.Monday’s tally is far below the country’s record set on July 16, when there were 77,255 new cases in a 24-hour-reporting period.An additional 460 coronavirus-related fatalities were also recorded Sunday, down from a peak of 2,666 new fatalities reported on April 17.A total of 7,458,549 people in the United States have been diagnosed with COVID-19 since the pandemic began, and at least 210,195 of them have died, according to Johns Hopkins. The cases include people from all 50 U.S. states, Washington, D.C. and other U.S. territories as well as repatriated citizens.By May 20, all U.S. states had begun lifting stay-at-home orders and other restrictions put in place to curb the spread of the novel coronavirus. The day-to-day increase in the country’s cases then hovered around 20,000 for a couple of weeks before shooting back up and crossing 70,000 for the first time in mid-July. The daily tally of new cases has gradually come down since then but has hovered around 40,000 in recent weeks.Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.,Myriam Borzee/iStockBy MORGAN WINSOR, ABC News(NEW YORK) — A pandemic of the novel coronavirus has now killed more than 1 million people worldwide.Over 35.5 million people across the globe have been diagnosed with COVID-19, the disease caused by the new respiratory virus, according to data compiled by the Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins University. The criteria for diagnosis — through clinical means or a lab test — has varied from country-to-country. Still, the actual numbers are believed to be much higher due to testing shortages, many unreported cases and suspicions that some national governments are hiding or downplaying the scope of their outbreaks.Since the first cases were detected in China in December, the virus has rapidly spread to every continent except Antarctica.The United States is the worst-affected country, with more than 7.4 million diagnosed cases and at least 210,237 deaths.California has the most cases of any U.S. state, with more than 835,000 people diagnosed, according to Johns Hopkins data. California is followed by Texas and Florida, with over 794,000 cases and over 717,000 cases, respectively.More than 190 vaccine candidates for COVID-19 are being tracked by the World Health Organization, at least seven of which are in crucial phase three trials.Here’s how the news is developing Tuesday. All times Eastern:Oct 06, 12:35 pmCruise lines to test all passengers and crew before boardingCruise lines around the world have agreed to test all passengers and crew, if the ship carries 250 or more passengers.The new policy goes into effect immediately.“This is a travel industry first and an example of the cruise industry leading the way,” Cruise Lines International Association said in a statement. Myriam Borzee/iStockBy MORGAN WINSOR, ABC News(NEW YORK) — A pandemic of the novel coronavirus has now killed more than 1 million people worldwide.Over 35.5 million people across the globe have been diagnosed with COVID-19, the disease caused by the new respiratory virus, according to data compiled by the Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins University. The criteria for diagnosis — through clinical means or a lab test — has varied from country-to-country. Still, the actual numbers are believed to be much higher due to testing shortages, many unreported cases and suspicions that some national governments are hiding or downplaying the scope of their outbreaks.Since the first cases were detected in China in December, the virus has rapidly spread to every continent except Antarctica.The United States is the worst-affected country, with more than 7.4 million diagnosed cases and at least 210,237 deaths.California has the most cases of any U.S. state, with more than 835,000 people diagnosed, according to Johns Hopkins data. California is followed by Texas and Florida, with over 794,000 cases and over 717,000 cases, respectively.More than 190 vaccine candidates for COVID-19 are being tracked by the World Health Organization, at least seven of which are in crucial phase three trials.Here’s how the news is developing Tuesday. All times Eastern:Oct 06, 12:35 pmCruise lines to test all passengers and crew before boardingCruise lines around the world have agreed to test all passengers and crew, if the ship carries 250 or more passengers.The new policy goes into effect immediately.“This is a travel industry first and an example of the cruise industry leading the way,” Cruise Lines International Association said in a statement. CLIA ocean-going cruise line members have agreed to conduct 100% testing of passengers and crew prior to embarkation – a travel industry first. #WeAreCruise pic.twitter.com/DtBxaN3hnB— Cruise Lines International Association (CLIA) (@CLIAGlobal) October 6, 2020Oct 06, 12:18 pmUK reports over 14,000 new casesThere were 14,542 new cases of COVID-19 and 76 fatalities confirmed in the United Kingdom over the past 24 hours.The latest daily tally is just short of the record set over the weekend when Public Health England revealed that 15,841 cases between Sept. 25 and Oct. 2 were not included in the United Kingdom’s reported daily case counts due to a technical issue. The unreported cases were added retroactively to reach Saturday’s count of 12,872 new case and Sunday’s 22,961 — the country’s highest single-day rise yet.The cumulative total is now at 530,113 cases with 42,445 deaths, according to the latest data from the U.K. government.The United Kingdom is among a handful of European countries grappling with an uptick in COVID-19 cases, as a second wave of infections hits the region. More than 1,000 students and staff at two U.K. universities — 583 at the University of Sheffield and 433 at the University of Nottingham — are currently isolating after testing positive for COVID-19.ABC News’ Christine Theodorou contributed to this report.Oct 06, 11:54 amWTO sees less severe slump in goods trade this yearThe World Trade Organization (WTO) now predicts a 9.2% drop in global merchandise trade this year.The Geneva-based trade body released the estimate Tuesday, revising its forecast in April of a 12.9% decline this year, following “strong trade performance in June and July.”The WTO also now expects a 7.2% rise in merchandise trade next year, compared to the previous estimate of 21.3% growth.“Whether the recovery can be sustained over the medium term will depend on the strength of investment and employment,” the WTO cautioned. “Both could be undermined if confidence is dented by new outbreaks of COVID-19, which might force governments to impose additional lockdowns.”Oct 06, 11:33 am15 clinical trials of COVID-19 vaccines underway in AfricaThere are 15 clinical trails of potential COVID-19 vaccines underway across the African continent, according to a comment by the Africa Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that was published Tuesday in the journal Nature.Five trials are being carried out in South Africa, four in Egypt and one each in Ghana, Guinea-Bissau, Kenya, Uganda, Zambia and Zimbabwe.“We’ve seen a scramble for access to therapies before,” the Nature comment said. “It happened with HIV and H5N1 influenza, for example. And Africa has ended up at the end of the queue every time. Yet the global economy depends on the continent for its exports of raw materials, food, energy and labour.”“This experience — and the fact that other infectious diseases will surely emerge — is why Africa needs a coordinated strategy to develop, finance, manufacture and deliver vaccines across the continent,” the comment added.For the past few months, the Africa CDC has been working with African leaders and global health officials on a “whole of Africa” coordinated approach to do just that.“Infectious agents span the globe in weeks: vaccinating people on one continent is essential to the health, wealth and well-being of those on the others,” the Nature comment said. “No region can be immune until a meaningful and equitable share of the world’s population is protected — by the tenets of good basic public health as well as a vaccine.”Since the start of the coronavirus pandemic, more than 1.5 million people across the African continent have been diagnosed with COVID-19 and nearly 37,000 of them have died. South Africa accounts for nearly half of all confirmed cases on the continent, according to the latest data from the Africa CDC.Oct 06, 8:47 amItaly on verge of making face masks mandatory outdoorsItalian Health Minister Roberto Speranza said Tuesday the government is working on a proposal to make the use of face masks outdoors mandatory nationwide, as COVID-19 infections have steadily increased in recent months.Italy, once the epicenter of the coronavirus pandemic, gradually loosened restrictions during the spring and summer, following a nearly three-month lockdown that helped get its COVID-19 outbreak under control. But now the country — like several others across Europe — is seeing an uptick in infections.On Saturday, Italy reported 2,844 new cases of COVID-19, its highest single-day jump since April, but still far less than the daily figures being recorded in France, Spain and the United Kingdom as Europe grapples with a second wave of infections.“We must raise our guard with the awareness that our county is better off than others,” Speranza told the lower house of parliament on Tuesday.The government is expected to announce the new measures by Wednesday. Several regions in Italy have already made mask-wearing compulsory, but there is currently no nationwide mandate.“Italy, together with Germany, is the one that in the EU is holding up the second wave better,” Speranza said. “But we must not have any illusions.”Since the start of the pandemic, Italy’s civil protection agency has recorded at least 327,586 confirmed cases with 36,002 deaths.Oct 06, 7:54 amEU agency fast-tracks process on 2nd COVID-19 vaccine candidateThe European Union’s drug regulator has started reviewing a second potential vaccine for COVID-19, which is being developed by Germany’s BioNTech in collaboration with American pharmaceutical company Pfizer.The European Medicines Agency (EMA) announced Tuesday that it has begun a “rolling review” of the latest vaccine candidate in an accelerated regulatory approval process, examining the data as it becomes available rather than waiting for the trial to end.“The start of the rolling review means that the committee has started evaluating the first batch of data on the vaccine, which come from laboratory studies (non-clinical data),” the EMA said in a statement. “This does not mean that a conclusion can be reached yet on the vaccine’s safety and effectiveness, as much of the evidence is still to be submitted to the committee.”The agency added that its decision to start the expedited approval process for the vaccine candidate was based on preliminary results from non-clinical and early clinical studies in adults which suggest that the drug triggers the body’s immune system to fight COVID-19.Last week, the EMA began its first review process of a COVID-19 vaccine candidate — a rolling review of one being developed by U.K.-based pharmaceutical company AstraZeneca in collaboration with England’s University of Oxford.Oct 06, 6:55 amIndia records lowest single-day rise in cases since AugustIndia confirmed another 61,267 new cases of COVID-19 in the past 24 hours, its lowest single-day increase since Aug. 25.An additional 884 coronavirus-related fatalities were also recorded. The country’s cumulative total now stands at 6,685,082 confirmed cases with 103,569 deaths, according to the latest data from the Indian Ministry of Health and Family Welfare.India is only the second country to surpass six million total cases, after the United States. The vast nation of 1.3 billion people has the highest COVID-19 infection rate of anywhere in the world, although it is now on a downward trend. India is on track to become the pandemic’s worst-hit nation within weeks, overtaking the United States, where more than 7.4 million people have been diagnosed with COVID-19.India also has the highest number of recovered COVID-19 patients in the world, with nearly 5.7 million people who have survived the disease. The country’s recovery rate stands at 84%, according to the health ministry.Oct 06, 6:15 amSacred Heart University suspends over 100 students for violating COVID-19 policiesSacred Heart University in Fairfield, Connecticut, has suspended more than 100 students for violating the school’s COVID-19 policies, according to a report by New Haven ABC affiliate WTNH-TV.University officials confirmed to WTNH that there have been at least 109 suspensions since the start of the fall semester due to various health and safety violations that include not wearing face masks, not social distancing and having unauthorized visitors in residence hall rooms.The suspended students were informed that they cannot come back to campus for periods ranging from one week to the rest of the semester. They will continue to attend classes remotely in the meantime, according to WTNH.University leaders hope the suspensions send a clear message that the coronavirus pandemic remains a very real threat and that safety is the number one goal for a successful semester back on campus.“We want everyone to protect themselves and protect each other so that we can end the semester here on campus and have a full semester of on-campus, on-ground learning,” Larry Weilk, dean of students at Sacred Heart University, told WTNH. “Prior to the start of the year, we developed what we call a pioneer promise where we asked all students faculty and staff to promise to protect themselves, the campus community, and the greater Bridgeport and Fairfield community as well.”“We’re all in this together,” he added. “We’re all trying to protect each other and stay healthy.”Oct 06, 5:12 am33 US states and territories in upward trajectory of new cases, FEMA memo saysAn internal memo from the Federal Emergency Management Agency obtained by ABC News on Monday night shows that 33 U.S. states and territories are in an upward trajectory of COVID-19 infections, while four jurisdictions are at a plateau and 19 others are in a downward trend.Both the number of new cases and the number of new deaths reported across the United States were  down Monday in week-over-week comparisons. There were 301,308 new cases confirmed during the period of Sept. 28-Oct. 4, a 2.5% decrease from the previous week. There were also 4,871 coronavirus-related fatalities recorded during the period of Sept. 28-Oct. 4, a 8.2% decrease compared with the week prior, according to the memo.However, the national positivity rate for COVID-19 tests increased slightly from 4.4% to 4.7% in week-to-week comparisons. Currently, 20% of hospitals across the country have more than 80% of beds full in their intensive care units. That figure was 17-18% during the summertime peak, the memo said.In Alabama, COVID-19 cases accounted for 9.2% of the state’s inpatients during the week ending Sept. 29. The number of new cases nearly tripled in the western city of Tuscaloosa — from 562 to 1,549 — between the weeks ending Sept. 22 and Sept. 29, according to the memo.In Colorado, there was a 42.2% relative increase in the number of new COVID-19 cases in Adams County between the weeks ending Sept. 22 and Sept. 29, driven by people under the age of 20. Meanwhile, nearly 80% of cases recorded in the northern city of Boulder since Aug. 24 have been linked to the University of Colorado, the memo said.In Hawaii, there was a cluster of nine COVID-19 cases confirmed at the University of the Nations Kona campus in the town of Kailua-Kona, according to the memo.Oct 06, 4:22 amUS reports nearly 40,000 new casesThere were 39,562 new cases of COVID-19 identified in the United States on Monday, according to a real-time count kept by Johns Hopkins University.Monday’s tally is far below the country’s record set on July 16, when there were 77,255 new cases in a 24-hour-reporting period.An additional 460 coronavirus-related fatalities were also recorded Sunday, down from a peak of 2,666 new fatalities reported on April 17.A total of 7,458,549 people in the United States have been diagnosed with COVID-19 since the pandemic began, and at least 210,195 of them have died, according to Johns Hopkins. The cases include people from all 50 U.S. states, Washington, D.C. and other U.S. territories as well as repatriated citizens.By May 20, all U.S. states had begun lifting stay-at-home orders and other restrictions put in place to curb the spread of the novel coronavirus. The day-to-day increase in the country’s cases then hovered around 20,000 for a couple of weeks before shooting back up and crossing 70,000 for the first time in mid-July. The daily tally of new cases has gradually come down since then but has hovered around 40,000 in recent weeks.Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

‘Protect Breonna, protect myself’: Breonna Taylor’s boyfriend recounts night she was killed

first_imgCourtesy of Breonna Taylor’s FamilyBy EMILY SHAPIRO, ABC News(LOUISVILLE, Ky.) — When Breonna Taylor’s door flew open in the middle of the night, her boyfriend, Kenneth Walker, said what was going through his head was, “Protect Breonna, protect myself.”In an interview with ABC News and Louisville’s Courier Journal Wednesday, Walker recounted the night he witnessed 26-year-old Taylor get shot dead by police in her Louisville home.Taylor, a medical worker, was killed in her home shortly after midnight on March 12 by Louisville police officers, touching off protests across the country.She had met Walker about nine years before through Twitter. They were friends for years until a romance developed in 2016, Walker said, describing Taylor as “loving, giving” and “uplifting.”Though they would break up and get back together, Walker said they had plans to move in together and possibly have a baby.In the early hours of March 13, Taylor was asleep and Walker was dozing off when he said “there was a loud bang at the door.”“Breonna screamed out, ‘Who is it?’” Walker said, and “nobody said anything, so at this time we’re getting up to put on clothes to see who it is.”There were more loud bangs but still no answers from whoever was at the door, Walker said.“I grab my gun and we proceed to answer the door. When we get right in the doorway of the bedroom, the door flies open,” Walker said.“Protect Breonna, protect myself. That’s what was going through my head,” Walker explained.“I figure it’s intruders … I couldn’t see anybody — it was pitch black.”At the door were Louisville police officers trying to execute a search warrant as part of an investigation into a suspected drug operation allegedly linked to Taylor’s ex-boyfriend.Walker said he fired a single shot “at the ground” with his licensed gun.One officer was struck in the leg.“After I fired that shot it was silence briefly,” Walker said, followed by a “hail of gunfire.”Police opened fire and Taylor was shot multiple times.“I grab Breonna and I drop to the ground,” Walker said. “She did scream … that’s the last sounds that she made.”“After the gunfire it was quiet for a long time,” Walker said. “It was just me screaming for help.”Walker said he called his mother, then 911 and then Taylor’s mother. When Walker went outside, he said he expected the authorities were there to help him, so he was confused to see a massive police presence and officers’ guns pointed at him.“I was terrified,” he said.No drugs were found in Taylor’s apartment.Walker was initially charged with attempted murder of a police officer but charges were later dropped.Although Walker claimed his gun was pointed at the ground when he fired the single shot, Sgt. Jon Mattingly, the officer who was shot while executing the warrant, said Tuesday in an exclusive interview with ABC News and Louisville’s Courier Journal that Walker “wasn’t shooting at the ground.”“He was in a stretched out, two hands — it’s called a Weaver stance, where your legs are apart. He’s pushed out with two hands, looking straight at me,” Mattingly said. “I saw his gun. Our postures were the same looking at each other when he fired that shot.”Walker and his lawyers contend Mattingly was shot by friendly fire. But Kentucky State Attorney General Daniel Cameron said all of the officers who fired shots were armed with .40-caliber weapons and Mattingly was shot with a 9mm gun, which matched the one Walker fired.Cameron said that because Walker fired the first shot, the officers were justified in their use of deadly force to protect themselves.Mattingly also said that he and the other six officers knocked on Taylor’s door six different times and repeatedly yelled, “Police, search warrant!” before they rammed the door open. However Walker and 11 other witnesses at Taylor’s apartment complex claimed they didn’t hear police announce themselves before they stormed in.Following Taylor’s death, one officer, Brett Hankison, was fired and the others were placed on administrative duty. But initially no charges were brought against the officers, igniting months of protests in Louisville.Six months after Taylor’s death, Cameron convened a grand jury to investigate possible charges against the officers. Last month a grand jury indicted Hankison on three counts of first-degree wanton endangerment for firing into the apartment directly behind Taylor’s, where three people were inside. Hankison pleaded not guilty.However Cameron told Louisville’s WDRB last month that his office didn’t give the grand jury the option to consider murder charges — so no officers were indicted on charges related to Taylor’s death, leading to further protests.Attorneys for Hankison and Walker as well as Taylor’s family advocated for the release of the grand jury transcript and evidence connected to the case. Walker’s civil lawyers filed a successful motion this month to have the evidence collected by Louisville police department’s Professional Integrity Unit released to the public.On Tuesday a judge ruled in favor of an anonymous grand juror in the case, allowing the juror to come forward and speak publicly about the court proceedings. Cameron had argued against grand jurors speaking out, saying it could set a dangerous precedent for courtroom privacy. But after the judge’s Tuesday decision, Cameron said he will not appeal.Federal officials are also investigating possible civil rights violations.Walker said that if police had identified themselves and then searched the home, Taylor’s death would have been avoided.“Whoever shot her is responsible for her death. Whoever came with that person … they’re responsible,” Walker said. “Whoever allowed them to come there … they’re responsible.”“They gotta live with that and feel that every day.”Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

Unaoil’s ‘secret mission’ in Iraq prompted by corrupt government influences, court hears

first_imgA defendant accused of corruption in the SFO bribery case claims Unaoil hid the extent of its influence to ensure a critical infrastructure project went ahead on merit The Unaoil investigation is tied to Iraq’s oil expansion after the fall of Saddam Hussein (Credit: Wikimedia Commons/US Navy/Lenny M Francioni) Corruption at the heart of Iraq’s Ministry of Oil forced Unaoil executives and associates to conceal their relationship with the country’s state-owned South Oil Company (SOC), a court heard.Their “secret mission” to ensure SOC got the most beneficial outcome of an industrial tender process to rebuild oil infrastructure in the south of the country following the US-led invasion is one that had earlier been painted by fraud prosecutors as concealment of bribery and illicit behaviour.But Ziad Akle, 45, one of three defendants accused by the UK’s Serious Fraud Office (SFO) of conspiracy to make corrupt payments in the country, told jurors at London’s Southwark Crown Court yesterday (24 February) that their actions had in fact been taken to protect SOC against the allegedly fraudulent influence of Iraq’s former deputy oil minister Ahmed al-Shamaa.“It was my job to look for the best for SOC,” said Akle, Unaoil’s former territory manager for Iraq, who was quizzed about keeping hidden the fact that his firm was advising the national oil company on the tender, despite another – UK-based engineering outfit Foster Wheeler – having been appointed to oversee the auction. Three men facing charges in SFO bribery caseAkle is facing criminal charges for conspiracy to make corrupt payment alongside two other men – Steven Whiteley, 65, who was Unaoil’s general territories manager for Iraq, and formerly a vice-president of SBM Offshore; and Paul Bond, 68, who was a senior sales manager for SBM Offshore.Netherlands-based SBM Offshore was one of the rivals to Bluewater during the SPM tender – eventually winning the contract – and the defendants are accused of taking illegal action to secure its victory.All three men deny the charges brought against them.The trial continues.center_img Unaoil concerned about corruption in Iraq oil ministryThe work on offer was for part of a multi-billion dollar scheme – the Iraq Crude Oil Export Expansion Project (ICOEEP) – to upgrade and expand the country’s oil export capacity from 1.8 million barrels per day (bpd) to 4.5 million bpd in the post-Saddam years.“The mission we were on needed to be kept secret,” said Akle. “SOC had hired Foster Wheeler and it would be held against [SOC] to be taking advice from a third party.“The project would be taken out of SOC’s control if Foster Wheeler found out, and that meant it would be likely to fail.“Ministry interference and control would interfere with the success of the project.“There were corrupted influences in the oil ministry under al-Shamaa, and they would try to take the contract away from SOC.”Akle said the appointment of Foster Wheeler had raised concerns about an apparent lack of expertise on the manufacturing processes and equipment involved – notably buoys used in single point mooring (SPM) systems – prompting SOC to seek out Unaoil’s help.There was also “suspicion” that the influence of al-Shamaa was biasing the tender process in favour of Netherlands-based Bluewater – a firm said to be working “hand-in-hand” with both Foster Wheeler and the deputy oil minister through their shared agent.“It made it more difficult for us to establish a level playing field with SOC,” said Akle. “[The agent] was favouring Bluewater in the evaluation.”In response, Akle claims Unaoil contacts within SOC shared documents and information about the tender process in order to help the Monaco firm ensure the bidding was decided by “technical merit” and not the “preferential arguments” being laid out by Bluewater and Foster Wheeler.last_img read more

Mayor Urges People to Stay Home

first_imgDear Friends, We are facing extraordinary times, and our world is changing in ways that would have been unimaginable just a few weeks ago. But we must do everything in our power to slow the spread of the coronavirus pandemic before it’s too late. We must do what we can to protect every member of our community. I am asking that everybody please stay at home, limit travel only to essential destinations, and practice social distancing if you have to go out.These are guidelines that have been shared at every level from the federal Centers for Disease Control down to the Cape May County Department of Health. These recommendations include avoiding unnecessary travel to, from and within Ocean City. In order for this request to have any meaningful effect, it must apply to all unnecessary travel – not just to out-of-state visitors. It saddens me to see the divisiveness spawned by recent statements irresponsibly singling out this population.As most of you know, I am the owner of the Gillian’s Wonderland Pier amusement center. I am fully aware of the impact of these restrictions on all businesses in town. But now is the time for all of us to work together. The health of our community must be our first priority. So please stay at home, and please check on your neighbors – particularly the elderly – to make sure all of their needs are met. Visit www.ocnj.us/ocnjcare, call 609-399-6111 or email [email protected] to learn more about how to volunteer or to seek assistance through the newly launched community program OCNJ CARE.  Warm regards,Mayor Jay A. Gillian Mayor Jay Gillianlast_img read more

News story: Baby born mid-flight in coastguard helicopter

first_imgHM Coastguard’s aeronautical rescue coordination centre, was called by South West ambulance at 1900 hrs to request assistance with a woman who had gone into labour whilst visiting the Isles of Scilly. Since there was not a midwife on the islands on Saturday 18 August the mum, ‘bump’ and dad needed to be evacuated from the islands to a hospital on the mainland.The Newquay coastguard helicopter was scrambled, collected a midwife en route, touched down at St Mary’s airport, picked up the man and woman then began the trip to the Royal Cornwall Hospital at Treliske, near Truro. However, the baby boy was in such a hurry he decided to make a guest appearance onboard the aircraft. At 2053 hrs, with the help of the midwife and aircrew, the healthy baby boy was born.Jonathan Mustard, aeronautical operations controller for HM Coastguard said:“This is the second time in recent times, that a baby has been born on board a coastguard helicopter. The last one was born over Lunna Holm, Shetland in December 2012. We are absolutely thrilled and delighted to have played a part in the birth and are pleased that mum and baby are doing well. It’s rare to hear that our helicopter launched with 7 people on board, but were preparing to land with 8. Congratulations mum and dad!”last_img read more